Day 16 July 2005

1.00 PM

Welcome

Abstract

Brian Kelly, chair of the IWMW workshop series, gave an introduction to the workshop.

Resources

The slides are hosted on Slideshare. https://www.slideshare.net/iwmw/iwmw-2005-welcome

1.15 PM

University Blogging: What Happens When Everyone Can Publish?

Abstract

In January 2004 the University of Warwick decided to offer a blog to every student and member of staff, starting in Oct 2004. This talks explores why this decision was taken, why Warwick elected to build its own blogging tool, how the project was implemented, and what happened when the blogs went live. Learning Outcomes At the end of the talk participants will have:
  • Learned about an agile development approach to building software
  • Gained insight into the AUP issues associated with web publishing
  • Examined the benefits and drawbacks of personal Web publishing in academic institutions
 

2.00 PM

Customers, Suppliers, and the Need for Partnerships

Abstract

Successful Web services arise from successful partnerships. Meeting the many and varied needs of customers requires a chain of partnerships between many and varied suppliers. With the pervasive web, how do these partnerships translate into effective services? More to the point, what happens when the partnerships cannot be established or fail to endure? This session will use the model of customer chains to reveal how partnerships have led to both successes and failures in the provision of the LSE's web services: the LSE Web site and LSE for You. Examples presented will include the Academic Staff Publications Catalogue (now central to LSE's RAE), Graduate Prospectus and Class Registers (a portal tool used for recording student attendance and performance). Lessons learnt and rules of thumb will be highlighted to both serve as a basis for comparison and offer guidelines for participants. Learning Outcomes At the end of the talk participants will:
  • Understand customer chains, their complex interactions, and their impact upon successful web services
  • Be able to prioritise the customer chains that underlie an institution's strategic priorities
  • Be aware of strategies and tactics for developing and sustaining partnerships along priority customer chains
 

Resources

The slides are available on Slideshare https://www.slideshare.net/iwmw/iwmw-2005-customers-suppliers-and-the-need-for-partnerships

2.45 PM

Discussion Groups 1

Discussion group sessions were held on Wednesday 6th June from 14:45-15:30 and Thursday 7th June from 11:45-12:30. The discussion groups were be based on regions. The topic of the discussion groups is content management systems. In the first discussion group session you should identify the main challenges which need be be addressed in order to ensure that the requirements for a CMS are defined and that a CMS can be deployed effectively into service. The discussion groups should agree on the top three issues. These issues should then be addressed in the second discussion group session. In this session you should seek answers to the most important issues. In addition each discussion group should highlight one key area which they would like the final panel session to address on the final day of the workshop. Each discussion group should choose a reporter who will give a brief report back on Friday 8th June in the session running from 11:00-11:45. The report should also mention the key area to be addressed by the panel.
Day 27 July 2005

9.00 AM

Challenges at the University of Manchester arising from Project UNITY

Abstract

The University of Manchester has just become the newest, (and largest single-site), higher education institution in the UK having been created from a merger premised on some substantive assertions with regard to establishing a research led world-class institution. The Web is the first experience that most applicants have of the university, and it promises to be the mechanism by which we will support the research, learning and administrative processes for the next decade, from 'cradle to grave'. The presentation will disclose the rationale for the merger and the plans made for the IT/IS infrastructures that will be developed to support the new vision (Manchester 2015). It will highlight the management issues concerning the development of brand image, interim environments, and the investments to gain real benefit from integrated environments to support the vision. It will ask the questions: Has Manchester taken a step too far in its IT/IS expectations? What is the future for the Web at Manchester? Can an integrated environment be delivered via the Web? Learning Outcomes At the end of the talk participants will:
  • Considered the Web as a strategic component of an institution vision
  • Considered the Web as a vehicle for business process reorganisation
  • Considered the requirements for a disaster recovery strategy
  • Considered the question of ownership and responsibilities
  • Considered the business case surrounding the Web and associated technologies

Resources

See slides hosted on Slideshare. https://www.slideshare.net/iwmw/iwmw-2005-challenges-at-the-university-of-manchester-arising-from-project-unity  

9.45 AM

Sky High or Free Fall – All Aboard the Web Rollercoaster

Abstract

The first 10 years of the Web have been a rollercoaster ride, largely undertaken with IT professionals at the controls. With exciting new developments in personalisation (portals), publishing (blogs) and procurement (e-business), the baton is now passing to Marketing experts as web tools increasingly become commodity supplies. David Sweeney explores how IT, Marketing and other professionals will interact to ensure that an institutional web presence remains its most effective method of exposure, delivering the maximum value with the minimum effort for users.

Resources

See slides hosted on Slideshare. https://www.slideshare.net/iwmw/iwmw-2005-sky-high-or-free-fall-all-aboard-the-web-rollercoaster  

11.00 AM

There Is No Such Thing As A Silver Bullet: CMS And Portals Will Not Solve Your Problems!

Abstract

Portals (as a front end) and content management systems (as a back end) are being touted by many as the solution to our problems of serving and locating information. This talk will explore some of the issues that they raise and why they cannot provide a complete solution. But the good news is that it means you have a job for life (perhaps).  

11.45 AM

Discussion Groups 2

Discussion group sessions were held on Wednesday 6th June from 14:45-15:30 and Thursday 7th June from 11:45-12:30. The discussion groups were be based on regions. The topic of the discussion groups is content management systems. In the first discussion group session you should identify the main challenges which need be be addressed in order to ensure that the requirements for a CMS are defined and that a CMS can be deployed effectively into service. The discussion groups should agree on the top three issues. These issues should then be addressed in the second discussion group session. In this session you should seek answers to the most important issues. In addition each discussion group should highlight one key area which they would like the final panel session to address on the final day of the workshop. Each discussion group should choose a reporter who will give a brief report back on Friday 8th June in the session running from 11:00-11:45. The report should also mention the key area to be addressed by the panel.

2.00 PM

Publish And Be Damned: Re-purposing In The Real World

Abstract

Over many years in UK institutions too many people have spent too much time with too little resource providing for the specificities of parallel publishing and re-purposing. This talk provides a case study of UCL's approach to integration between the print and Web worlds for recruitment publications. We will look at the technical solution whereby database integration with publishing software and CMS has been the goal and, perhaps just as important, the cultural challenge in terms of ownership of the processes and copy. We will review lessons learned from the pilot project - the publication of UCL's Study Abroad Guide - and plans for the future involving all mainstream recruitment publications. Learning Outcomes At the end of the talk participants will have:
  • Learned about practical integration technologies for parallel publishing
  • Understood the cultural challenges involved in taking forward such a project
  • Considered issues relevant to scaling such solutions to the enterprise level

Resources

See slides hosted on Slideshare. https://www.slideshare.net/iwmw/iwmw-2005-publish-and-be-damned-repurposing-in-the-real-world

2.45 PM

The Web Management Community: Present and Future

Abstract

From the early days of the first CWIS to the current proliferation of CMSs and portals, people doing the Web in HE/FE have helped each other, notwithstanding continuing diversity of roles, organisational location, resourcing and professional trajectories. The web-support and website-info-mgt JISCMail lists and the IWMW workshop series are obvious examples of how people have tried to share knowledge and benchmark good practice. Intermittently, at least, regional groups have offered similar collaborative opportunities. Andrew Cox will summarise findings from a doctoral study of aspects of the Web community. Duncan Ireland will talk about his experience of running a regional support group. This will be followed by an opportunity for group discussion. This session will be an opportunity to reflect on the community's history and current state and to look forward to how we can maximise the value of such mutual support, including the possible role of new collaborative technologies. Learning Outcomes At the end of the panel session participants will:
  • Have gained awareness of the history and shape of the community.
  • Have gained an understanding of how participants can be helped and help others.
  • Have given some thought to future work, e.g. the potential of new technologies or role of surveys that could be undertaken to benchmark staffing of local services.
     
Day 38 July 2005

9.15 AM

IWMW Impact Analysis And Evaluation Session

This is the ninth annual Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW) and the time has come for us to ask a few questions. How effective have the workshops been in supporting institutional Web managers? Has the workshop provided an enjoyable break? Have you met up with like-minded people and been able to make some useful contacts? Have the lessons learnt at the events been deployed within your institutions? If so, how significant an impact have they had? What can we do to make the workshop better? This 30 minute session, which will be held twice, provides an opportunity for you to give your views. You will have an opportunity to say what you've liked and disliked and provide suggestions for next year's Institutional Web Management Workshop.

11.00 AM

Report Back

Report back from discussion groups

11.45 AM

Responding To The CMS Challenge

Abstract

The importance of Content Management Systems is widely appreciated across the Web management community. But the selection, deployment and management of Content Management Systems is likely to prove time-comsuming, with clear dangers if the wrong choice is made. This panel session will provide a forum for discussion of such high level issues. The panel will respond to the issues raised in the CMS discussion groups.

12.30 PM

Conclusions

Workshop Conclusions and details of IWMW 2006
W/shop A6 July 2005

4.00 PM

Hey! You! Get Offa My Web! Hidden Desires and Unforeseen Circumstances in Web Management [A1]

Abstract Have you ever watched in apoplectic, impotent horror as a new Web development at your institution:
  • broke accessibility guidelines
  • did not comply with the corporate style
  • was outsourced at great cost to an external company
  • was entirely written in Java or used a non-joined-up proprietary solution
  • ignored or trampled all over your department's interests
  • considered users as an afterthought, if at all?
  • was delayed, diluted or rendered pointless by everyone & their dog sticking their oars in?
  • was given a trillion pounds by management when you're struggling to cover your staff costs?
(Tick all that apply) Of course you have! All too often new Web developments are given to one particular group of 'players' in the University arena. No matter how well-intentioned, such developments inevitably have consequences beyond their perceived scope, often drastic ones! How can you shape developments in your favour if they are outside your immediate sphere of influence? This highly participative workshop will help delegates identify the players who might help or hinder their progress and enable them build alliances with those who have the desire, capability and authority to make it happen. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the session participants will be able to:
  • Identify the major players who influence the Web development process at their institution
  • Identify steps and strategies for building alliances with these players
  • Consider the impact of their own Web developments on others
 

4.00 PM

Conducting User Needs Analysis: Tips On Gathering Requirements People May Have For The Systems You’re Developing [A2]

Abstract This session presents an overview of techniques used to build an understanding what user want from the systems you are building. Users can give you insight into the types of functionality, content, site structure and interface design. An overview of requirements gathering techniques will be presented. Including tips on one-to-one interviewing, observation of current practices, facilitating focus groups and developing questionaires. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will:
  • Have gained an understanding of several techniques used for gathering end-user requirements.
  • Have explored how to conduct data gathering exercises and how to analyse and make use of the data.
  • Have considered the role your end-users can play in systems development.
 

4.00 PM

How to Find a Needle in the Haystack [A3]

Abstract Higher and further education provide a wide range of high-quality Web sites and services but the sheer range and number of these services can often be confusing to users, who may have to search across a number of resources, with different interfaces, search criteria and formats. The move towards the development of cross searching capabilities provides a means to simplify the users' experience, which should encourage take-up and allow institutions to provide one interface to a whole range of services. This session will look at the technologies that can be used to achieve cross searching capabilities, covering Z39.50, XMLOAI and the development of Web Services. The session will concentrate on looking at real life implementations of these technologies within the e-learning, bibliographic and archival domains. This session will argue that XML is the key enabler for the growth of a distributed searching environment. Learning Outcomes: This session is intended to provide a non-technical explanation of Web-based distributed searching applications and to show attendees that real progress is being made in implementing solutions for distributed searching. It will help people to appreciate the real-world benefits of XML.

4.00 PM

Future-proofing for Collaborative Tools [A4]

Abstract In the years since computer-mediated communication first became a reality, a bewildering variety of collaborative tools have become available, not all created equal. Some modify existing technologies, e.g. extension of browsers to permit collaborative use. Others are monolithic, such as the CAVE virtual environment. In some cases, multiple approaches exist to achieve the same result - for example, an electronic whiteboard can store work created during a meeting for later retrieval, but a basic whiteboard can be augmented relatively cheaply to permit its contents to be stored. This workshop will introduce a number of collaborative technologies. Participants will consider the benefits of each approach through discussion and group work. Finally, the group will discuss approaches to future-proofing (networks, buildings, infrastructure) for the next generation of collaborative tools. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will have:
  • Gained an understanding of the uses, benefits and limitations of collaborative tools.
  • Considered the use cases underlying various choices of system with respect to a variety of tasks and needs.
  • Been encouraged to explore the various tools available and to consider the advantages, if any, to their groups or organisations.
  • Considered the infrastructure needs for collaborative tool use and how these needs may vary according to the evolution of technology and user needs.
 

4.00 PM

Community Building – Open Source and Open Content [A5]

Abstract Successful open source projects tend to build substantial communities of users and developers. These communities are often facilitated by collaborative software perhaps best exemplified by SourceForge. Open content sites such as Wikipedia also generate substantial communities of user/developers. Here the remarkably low barrier to becoming a contributor helps create a related kind of community. This workshop explores key features of community development in the open source and open content world. It considers how these could be put to use by institutional Web sites. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the session participants will:
  • Be aware of key features of community development
  • Have an understanding of some of the differences between open source and open content communities
  • Have reflected upon what learning points are transferable to the institutional Web environment
 

4.00 PM

Whose Work Is It Anyway? [A6]

Abstract Dealing with external agencies for your web needs can be a frustrating experience - for you, as well as for them. Whether you're dealing with institutional IT services or a third-party company, there are many common problems that can occur. This workshop will take a look at the issues involved in getting the job done, including:
  • how to efficiently specify your work
  • how to pick an external company
  • how to check on and measure progress
  • how to sign off and quantify achievements
  • liaising between external companies and internal IT services
  • dealing with ongoing support and maintenance
Learning Outcomes: The outcomes of this workshop will be a set of recommendations that anyone can use when commissioning Web development work.  

4.00 PM

Embedding Third Party Services in Web Sites and Portals – From Links To WSRP the Pros and Cons [A7]

Abstract Institutional portals and Web sites are beginning to make use of third party sources in systematic ways. There are now an increasing number of ways in which this can be done including:
  • Linking to external sites (or channels)
  • Linking to external sites with customisation information in the link
  • Linking to external sites using single sign-on techniques
  • Embedding stand alone channels
  • Embedding sites through the use of CSS
  • Embedding sites through the use of HTML fragments
  • SOAP / JSR168
  • WSRP
The workshop will help you to explore the issues in using these, and other techniques, to include third party channels, exploring the advantages and disadvantages (for instance in the degree of customisation available) and the effort involved. Connects, the Learning and Teaching Portal, will be used as a case study as it offers most of these techniques - see <http://www.connect.ac.uk/> Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will have gained an understanding of the wide variety of techniques which can be used to embed external sites and channels within their own Web sites or portals. They will also have an idea of the advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques and the skill and effort required to implement them, which can then be used to decide what channels and sites to include within their own portals or web sites, and where multiple methods are offered to choose the most suitable.  

4.00 PM

Managing Stakeholders with PRINCE2 [A8]

Abstract PRINCE2 is a standard for project management that has been widely adopted within the UK public sector, including higher education. It centres on the need for a valid business case to justify projects not just at the outset but through to closure. It provides a simple framework for representation of and consultation with stakeholders through a project board composed of an Executive (who represents the 'business'), a Senior User, and a Senior Supplier. This workshop will convey the essence of PRINCE2 using the participants' own projects as well as experience at LSE as working examples. By avoiding the mistake of focusing on the bureaucratic aspects of PRINCE2, participants will learn to approach the management of projects not just in terms of 'those below' but also in terms of 'those above' and 'those to the side'. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the session participants will:
  • Understand PRINCE2 and how it can be applied effectively within public sector institutions.
  • Have assessed the relevance and potential value (or not) of PRINCE2 to their own institution.
  • Have gained a starting point to investigate PRINCE2 further.
 

4.00 PM

Lies, Damn Lies, and Web Statistics (Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts) [A9]

Abstract Web usage analysis by web server log analysis are known to be rough estimations, and useful in general terms only. There are many sources of error, such as the activity of search engine robots and spiders, proxy caching, and the dynamic nature of IP assignation by many ISPs. A newer type of analysis that tracks users in their browser claims to remove many of these problems, giving us a clearer picture of 'real user' activity. Such services are also in near-realtime -whereas previously, most institutions have downloaded logs weekly/monthly for analysis and then spent considerable resources preparing reports etc. In this session two different log analysis tools are compared, followed by a comparison of log analysis and browser-based analysis. As a result of this work, a consortium of national museums are considering moving to a hosted external service as a consortium. A consortium of universities have already moved to browser-based recording. Results from this work and issues raised by its implementation at several sites, will be presented. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will:
  • Have gained an understanding of the differences between log analysis and browser-based usage recording.
  • Have explored the sources of error in both types of analysis.
  • Have considered a hosted service as an alternative to in-house analysis (perhaps via a consortium approach).
  • Have gained an insight into the issues surrounding the implementation of browser-based analysis and the advantages it may bring.
  • What has been learned? Experiences from implementation and usage of browser-based tagging system. Overall trends and individual cases.
  • What for the future? What are the possible future implications and possibilities from browser based analysis.
 
W/shop B7 July 2005

4.00 PM

Whose Web Do You Think It Is? Considering Web Accessibility And Usability From The Perspective Of Different User Groups [B1]

Abstract Drawing on findings from an EU-funded project (the European Internet Accessibility Observatory), this workshop session will start with a presentation on accessibility and usability, focussing firstly on the different ways end-users access the Web and some of the problems they are faced with, particularly if they are accessing in a non-standard format or using assistive technologies. The session will then consider some of the tensions that may arise between different user groups when striving to embrace an 'access for all' approach. For example, the Web designers who may want to have unrestricted creativity, without having to adhere to strict accessibility guidelines or rules; the Web managers who may have to implement institutional accessibility policies and guidelines relating to the Web and e-learning; the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) who want to widen access to the Web through use of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). Learning Outcomes: The aim of this session is to demonstrate the need to take different user requirements into consideration in order to properly inform accessibility related development, policy and management decisions, and how a more informed approach can help to address the possible tensions between different groups. Participants will gain a better understanding of the different needs of user groups. This will help provide them with a more informed approach to Web accessibility and usability.

4.00 PM

From the Ridiculous to the Sublime? Lessons from Implementing a Corporate CMS at the University of Southampton [B2]

Abstract Within any institution there are numerous individuals with a desire to publish on the Web, and have often been free to do so, free from such concerns as accessibility, usability, standards or what anyone else in the organisation might be doing. CMS offers the opportunity to present audiences with a more coherent view of the organisation, but only if the content providers are willing to accept guidance on how best to prepare their material, and service providers are willing to listen to the needs of the various individuals and departments. The importance of spending time and effort on preparation before migrating to a corporate CMS cannot be overstated. In order to find out our customer requirements and equip ourselves with a thorough site specification, we have developed a practical workshop/workbook model. Departments and services are guided through a site analysis process that leads to the production of a site 'blueprint' - essential for a successful CMS migration. In this workshop we will provide a brief summary of the CMS implementation project at Southampton, then, working in groups, participants will be asked to complete a section of the workbook for a hypothetical Web site. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will:
  • Have made use of a tested methodology and toolkit that can be used within their own institutions
  • Have gained a better understanding of the requirements necessary for CMS driven Web sites.
 

4.00 PM

Democratising the Web: The Revenge of The Non-techie [B3]

Abstract The Web has become a key medium in the way organisations communicate with their customers and how they are perceived by them. However providing quality Web content consistently in an organisation the size of a university is, to say the least, a challenging proposition. As the amount of information that is published on the Web and user expectations increase, the publishing process requires stricter control. At the same time the only way this process can be managed effectively is to enable content owners to become Web publishers. Drawing on our experience at the University of Bristol over the past three years, this workshop session will explore ways of addressing this challenge. The session will also include a live demonstration of the through-the-Web, Zope-based Web publishing solution we use at Bristol. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will have:
  • gained an understanding of the challenges of large scale Web publishing
  • explored a possible strategy to meet these challenges
  • developed an appreciation of a Web publishing system based on Zope as used at the University of Bristol through a live demonstration
 

4.00 PM

Folksonomies: Metadata or Mess? [B4]

Abstract: A folksonomy is a decentralised, social approach to creating online metadata for digital assets. The result is a flat namespace with no hierarchy or control. This new practice, used on sites like del.icio.us and Flikr, has sparked off a lot of debate between those eager for a user-centred Web and others in favour of more formal classification systems. This workshop will look at the history of folksonomies and the issues involved in their use. Participants will have a go at personalised classification (tagging) and then through discussion and group work will consider its advantages and disadvantages. Finally participants will reflect on whether folksonomies have a role in an interoperable future. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will:
  • Have gained an understanding of what folksonomies are, how they are being used and their evolution.
  • Have explored how personal classification is carried out and the issues involved when choosing terms.
  • Have gained an understanding of when and why users might prefer to use a dynamic set of classifications rather than a static set and the advantages and disadvantages of both systems.
  • Have considered the role folksonomies can play in an interoperable Web.
 

4.00 PM

Inter-institutional Authorisation using Shibboleth: Myths, Lies and the Truth [B5]

Abstract Managing access to restricted web resources is a complex problem. It is hard to find a generalised solution for a given institution due to the wide variety of infrastructures and procedures that might be employed. Inter-institutional sharing, which is becoming more and more in demand, introduces further problems. Shibboleth technology is touted as the ideal solution for both. This workshop and will take a look at the complex problem of managing access to restricted content, including asking participants about their specific situations. We will introduce Shibboleth technology and how it tackles these problems, and provide materials including an executive summary of challenges to help you explain Shibboleth to co-workers and policy makers at your institution. No prior knowledge of Shibboleth is needed - this is a strictly non-technical workshop. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the session participants will:
  • Be aware of the size of the authorisation problem and what challenges inter-institutional authorisation brings
  • Have an understanding of Shibboleth technology and the decentralised approach to Web access management
  • be provided with support materials to help explain Shibboleth to co-workers
 

4.00 PM

Avoiding the Legal Obstacles in Web Management [B6]

Abstract This session will address various legal issues including Freedom of Information, privacy, ownership of project deliverables, sharing resources, Creative Commons and the UK General Public Licence. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session delegates will have gained a better understanding on how to avoiding some of the legal obstacles associated with Web management activities.

4.00 PM

WHS WEB S IT NEWY? – Including Mobile Phone Users in the Loop [B7]

Abstract Everyone knows that text messaging is hugely popular, particularly among 18-24 year olds. But to what extent are we making use of this technology in our institutions, whether as a marketing tool, or in communicating with our students and staff and allowing them to interact with the institution using this medium? The purpose of this workshop session is to highlight some of the useful facilities that are now cheaply available to enable institutions to make use of text messaging, particularly where the start or end point is a web interface, hence its relevance to managers of institutional Web services. We'll be looking at such things as:
  • conducting text polls with the results being shown on a Web page in real-time;
  • administering news alert services and "subscription groups" via a simple Web interface;
  • enabling students to text in their questions during a lecture ready to be displayed and answered at the end;
  • managing a text messaging marketing campaign via the Web;
  • developing SMS/MMS to Web interfaces;
  • and more.
Come with your mobile phone and some credit so that you can participate fully in this workshop. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will have gained an understanding of some of the services available to institutions that will enable them to exploit the immense popularity of text messaging as part of their corporate strategies (marketing, communication, web, teaching and learning, information etc). Having had an opportunity to take part in various demonstrations during the workshop, participants will be able to return to their institutions with first-hand experience of the potential for such systems.  

4.00 PM

JISC Service and Vendor Presentations [B8]

Abstract We will be running a 'JISC Services and Vendor Slot' in which vendors of commercial software will give brief presentations of their products. In addition several JISC services will also participate and will describe the services they provide. Speakers from each of the following organisations will talk for up to 10 minutes, with 5 minutes for questions:
  • Nedstat, Ranjit Sidhu
  • TERMINALFOUR
  • Contensis
  • RDN, Caroline Williams
  • OSS Watch, Randy Metcalfe
  • JISC infoNet: Providing resources for use in planning and implementing information systems, Andrew Stewart
  • Your Place or Ours? ... On-site Training from Netskills, Chris Young

4.00 PM

RSS: Let’s Clear The Confusion And Start Using! [B9]

Abstract RSS - great lightweight XML format for syndication, or confusing technology (does RSS stand for Really Simple Syndication, RDF Site Summary, Rich Site Summary - or something else?). This session aims to clarify the confusion and outline the potential for using RSS within Institutional Web site. Topics to be covered in the session include:
  • What can RSS offer me?
  • The RSS standards wars
  • A practical approach to use of RSS
  • Models for creating RSS
  • The RSS viewing environment
  • Emerging RSS technologies such as Podcasting
  • Quality assurance and trust issues
Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session participants will:
  • Have gained an understanding of the potential for RSS
  • Be aware of the confusions over RSS terminology
  • Understand the different approaches which can be used to create RSS
  • Have seen examples of different types of RSS viewers
  • Be in a position to make recommendations on use of RSS within their own institution
  • Be aware of quality assurance issues which will need to be addressed